Monday, 21 April 2014

Ishoo Ninty: Farmyard

At long last, here it is! The second TFH Ishoo of 2014 - Ishoo Ninty: Farmyard!
Yeah, I know, we've tackled things like this before. But I have a cool new technique to show you which I found on the Demo Gamers blog. Also, this ishoo makes use of printable templates. Originally, I made these for a 'How to make terrain' holiday program session, but they were not all used, so I employed one on this project to save a bit of time. Although I forgot to use the chimney - pity, because I have another new technique I could've demonstrated on that. Oh well. It can wait.
Anyway, enough rambling! Cue Grot and the Farmyard!
























And there you have it Hippo Fans! This whole project was completed in a day (well, it's Easter Monday, the last day of the school holidays, and I ran out of other stuff...) This was made possible by the accelerating effects of heat on PVA glue. The first time I made stone walls this way, they took days to dry. This time, by placing them in front of a small heater, I had them dry in hours. The same goes for the thin PVA on the towel thatch. It can take days to dry on it's own. Or it can take about an hour with a heater.

You can get Aluminium channel from Bunnings or any other hardware emporium. Mine is a 1m length of 20mm square channel. It cost about $5. 

Also, here's the template in question. I made this a while back, and I'd glued it to foamcore for a learn to build terrain session at Gippsland Gamers Holiday Program over summer. This is not the best way to use templates - you can't recycle them, and the paper can be annoying if you leave it on the outside. The correct way to use a template (which I found out later!) is to put it on your foamcore, and use a pin to punch holes at all the corners where lines meet. Then remove the template, and join the dots with a pen, pencil or marker. You can keep the template for later projects that way, and don't have to worry about making sure the paper is on the inside.



Until next time!

7 comments :

  1. Love your terrain tutorials. What "texturey paint" do you use to paint your worls?

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    Replies
    1. At present, Dulux's basic textured paint. It was called 'sandswept' but I think the name changed. I am looking at an alternative from Wattyl for next time - it's much more textured and looks almost like concrete when dried.

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  2. The method for doing the walls is absolutely inspired! I shall be making use of this - much better than individually making each wall section by engraving extruded polystyrene!

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    Replies
    1. Credit where it is due - this is NOT my technique. It was created by the Demo Gamers.

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  3. My laundry gets afternoon sun and gets exceedingly warm in there (especially summer) - so I tend to use it as my drying room for PVA gluing. I've had jobs that used to need overnight drying go completely dry in an hour and a half (I'm usually out of the house for this much time during the day).

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  4. Great tutorial, very inspirational.
    Could you please tell me more about the towel you used on the roof?

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    Replies
    1. It's old, it's yellow and I bought it at an op-shop. There's really nothing more to tell.

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